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Full text of "Stout Alumnus, Spring 1982"

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UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



SPRING 



1982 




Library opens new vistas for Stout 



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When students and staff returned to campus for the 
opening of spring semester, they were greeted with a 
new, modern, streamlined library facility that had just 
opened its doors. The facility will bo dedicated April 24. 

Modestly labeled the Stout Library Learning Center, 
the impressive five-story, $6.7 million structure represents 
more than a dozen years of planning and preparation. 

Located at the corner of 10th Avenue and Third St., 
the building rests on the. site of the former Carter Ice 
House. Most recently, the area was used as an unpaved 
parking lot. 

With more than 123,000-square feet of space, the 
building is nearly double the size of the old Pierce 
Library, located across the street. David Barnard, dean 
of Learning Resources, said the need for a new library 
facility at Stout was recognized as early as 1970. "When 
I became dean, the first thing I did was take a look at 
the physical library situation," Barnard said. "It was 
obvious that (the old library) was not going to be a 
satisfactory arrangement." 



Pierce Library opened in 1954 and an addition to it 
was completed in 1969. "One of the biggest problems 
was that literally a third of the (old library) building was 
constructed in the early 1950's and was not air- 
conditioned," said Joe Jax, Library Learning Center 
director and assistant dean of Learning Resources. "In 
the summer, it was not unusual to have 90-to 95-dcgree 
temperatures in the periodical stacks, where there were 
only 7-foot ceilings. Paper life today is only about 20 
years and you compound that with humidity and 
temperatures of 90 or above and we were in serious 
trouble." Jax added that a lack of strict temperature 
control also created problems for audiovisual equipment 
used in the library. "The problem that we had with the 
old library, other than the fact that it was too small, 
was that of its arrangement," Barnard said. "It didn't 
have the functional things that should be next to one 
another." For example, periodicals were stored in dif- 
ferent locations and equipment was spread throughout 
the building. "It was terribly inefficient," Jax said. 



The old building's physical arrangement made access 
particularly difficult for people with disabilities. "The 
handicap access was extremely poor," Jax said. "It was 
a maze to get around in." 

Barnard pointed out that getting the needed facility 
was a long, complicated and often frustrating process. 
Part of that process involved visits to other library 
facilities. "We set out and visited some 60 libraries 
throughout the United States," Jax said. "This helped 
a lot in deciding what we wanted to do and what we 
didn't want to do." 

In an interview with the Stout Alumnus, Barnard out- 
lined the intricate procedure of getting the building 
approved by various state agencies, the state Building 
Commission and the Legislature. It even involved a 
trip to campus by former Gov. Patrick J. Lucey, who 
arrived as a skeptic, but who left as a believer in the 
need for a new building. "A lot of people don't realize 
how much time it takes to achieve a goal like this," 
Barnard said. He added jokingly, "the gestation period 
of elephants is about 24 months and this was about 12 
years." What finally emerged was a 300-page planning 
statement, and ultimately, the completed building. 

"Getting this facility for Stout is going to be a signifi- 
cant factor in the development of the University in the 
future," Barnard said. The building's features range 
from major changes to minor improvements designed to 
make things more pleasant for library users. 

One of the most notable aspects of the building is 
that it allows full implementation of Stout's method of 
cataloging and storing library materials. Previously used 
in the old library to some extent, the approach is de- 
scribed by Jax as "one-stop shopping" for patrons. "We 
have integrated, for convenience of use, all of the audio- 
visual materials with the printed materials," Jax ex- 
plained. "If you arc looking for a book on plastics, you 
are going to find all the slides, all the transparencies, 
the audiotapes, the videotapes, right in the same section." 
The same applies to using the card catalog, which lists 
all available material, not just books. 

Computer technology is also an important aspect of 
the facility. Apple microcomputers and terminals with 
access to the University's Academic Computer Center 
are available on the fourth and fifth floors. In addition, 
the traditional card catalogs will be converted to a 
computer operation in the near future. "We will have 
20-to 25-terminals in the library with keyboards for the 
public to access the collection by author title, subject 
or call number," Jax said. "It (the computer operation) 
will take care of circulation so that you can tell, not 
only if we have a book, but who has it, how many 
times its been checked out, when it's due. Users will 
be able to reserve that book if it's out, so when it comes 
back it will be immediately tagged." 

An important feature of the building will be addi- 
tional study rooms. For example, eight small-group study 
rooms, equipped for use with audiovisual projection, are 
available through reservation. Ten graduate and faculty 
study cubes with security locks and accommodations 
for 30 persons have been installed. Also, 50 graduate 
student carrels are available for assignment on a 
semester-by-semester basis. 

Some of the nicer touches also include an in-house 
telephone system through which users can get assistance 
from the circulation and reference desk; an outdoor study 
balcony; an outdoor drive-up book return; and service 
centers on each floor where equipment such as tape 
recorders, copiers, computer terminals and electric type- 



writers are centrally located. Many of these ideas were 
suggested by students who served on the building's 
planning committee. 

Because the bid for the building's construction came 
to about $1 million less than had been estimated, other 
features could be added. These include a natural cedar 
wood decor and a considerable amount of aesthetically 
pleasing interior brick. 

The building's lobby has been furnished with glass 
display cases and movable panels. The library expects' 
to feature both exhibits of its own resources and services 
and a variety of displays of work done by other units 
at the University. 

While Barnard is proud of the new building, he points 
out that it is really only one element of the library. 
"Whenever we talk about the building, I think you have 
to also keep in perspective that the building is only 
part of what we are talking about in this library," he 
(continued) 




The moving job 

"I sometimes feel like 
a railroad roundhouse 
operator," said Brooke 
Anson, the public 
service coordinator at 
Stout's Library Learning 
Center. Anson was re- 
ferring to the massive 
move from the old li- 
brary to the new facility, 
which he supervised, 

Anson pointed out 
that moving a library 
the size of Stout's can 
i/ . ^^ ^^^0^"^^ ^ )e a complicated project. 
' ■ ™ i' ■ Jfc MdBBBMBlL : "It's having to identify 
Anson everything that we own 

— that we take for 
granted — and making sure everything comes to- 
gether in the end," Anson said. 

The move was timed to correspond with the 
break between first and second semester at Stout. 
A 30-member crew from a commercial moving 
firm was used to make the switch, along with 
approximately 20 additional staff members from 
the library. 

To illustrate the size of the project, Anson offered 
the following statistics: the move involved 179,000 
volumes of books plus 12,300 audiovisual items 
such as film, tape and transparencies. In terms of 
linear feet, this shelved material would reach 3.7 
miles, Periodicals represent another 1.8 miles. 
There were 1,400 drawers of catalog cards and 24 
drawers containing 390,000 microfiche. This was 
in addition to the usual library and office equip- 
ment found in such a facility. 

Also involved in the move to the new building 
were the academic skills laboratory, the self- 
instruction laboratory and administrative offices 
for the dean of Learning Resources. 

Construction delays caused several changes in 
moving dates and late arrival of some shelving 
further complicated the matter. 

But despite the problems, the library was open 
for service when the new semester began. 



said. "Take our staff for example. I don't think any 
academic library in the state has a more motivated, 
service-oriented staff than we do. We hear this from 
people from the outside many times. Our people are 
always there to help." 

Jax and Barnard both speak of a "people oriented" 
philosophy for the operation of the library. "The basic 
philosophy is that all of the materials that are ordered, 
processed and cataloged should be available for public 
use," Jax said. "In other words, if we get a film, it 
should not be just for faculty, it should be equally avail- 
able for students." He points out that loan periods for 




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faculty and staff are the same for students and fines 
for late returns are also the same, 

Barnard and Jax display a sense of both satisfaction 
and relief, now that the building is complete and the 
library is operating smoothly. "It's a sense of satisfaction, 
not so. much in the bricks and mortar as in what this is 
going to mean to the students and the faculty who have 
need for it." Barnard said. Jax described the project as 
"a pinnacle of experience" for him, as a professional 
librarian. "It is the optimum in one's profession to have 
a facility perform your professional dreams," Jax said. 
"And that's what it's been." 



Making it happen 



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Barnard 

Although many people 




Jax 



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were involved in 
tion of the new Library Learning Center, much of 
the effort was directed by two individuals: Dave 
Barnard and Joe Jax. Barnard is dean of Learning 
Resources at Stout and Jax is assistant dean and 
director of the Center. Collectively their years of 
service to the institution total more than a half 

Barnard, whose association with the University 
goes back to his days as a transfer student, has 
been on the staff for 36 years. He was appointed 
dean in 1973. fax was appointed library director 
in 1972. 

Barnard started at Stout teaching graphic arts 
and eventually became, involved in photography 
courses. In 1959, he was instrumental in establishing 
an audiovisual graduate program, now known as 
media technology. He was also responsible for 
integrating the once separate functions of library 
and audiovisual into a single instructional support 
unit, Learning besourees. 

Barnard has the distinction of having more years 
of service to the University than any other present 
staff member. "1 think it boils down to this," lie 
said. "In all of the years I was working and de- 
veloping things and doing things, 1 always did 
what I thought seemed to be the logical and right 
tiling to try and do. No matter what (administrators) 
I was working under, they always seemed to give 
me moral support and encouragement. They would 
try to back you up as much as thev could. You 
know, (lint's a great plus." 

Jax came to Stout in 1960. "I came thinking I 
was going to stay a couple of years,' lie said. "1 
grew to like the place. While I've been here, I've 
had a chance to grow." 

Jax has done consulting work on a national and 
international basis. In addition to his professional 
library work, he was also involved in coaching 
basketball and served one year as head coach in 
the absence of Dwain Mintz, who was on leave to 
complete his doctorate. Jax has been involved in 
civic affairs and, among other things, served for six 
years as president of the Menomonie City Council. 



Clyde Bowman 1887-1981 



Clyde Bowman, Stout's first 
dean of Industrial Education 
and one-time acting president, 
died recently in Sherborn, Mass. 

Family members have re- 
quested that memorials be sent 
to the Stout University Founda- 
tion Inc. 

Chancellor Robert S. Swanson 
described Bowman as a "guid- 
ing hand" who epitomized the 
image of die University. "Clyde 
Bowman was Mr. Stout for so 
many years," Swanson said. "As 
a senior dean, he had a great 
deal to do with making Stout 
what it is." 

Bowman joined the Stout staff 
in 1919 as the first dean of 
Industrial Education. He also 
was acting president of the in- 
stitution in 1923. Bowman is 
credited with providing national 





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leadership in industrial educa- 
tion and in making Stout well- 
known in this field. He de- 
veloped and taught an organiza- 
tional system called "Bowman- 
ology." He retired from Stout 
in 1952. Bowman Hall, the well- 



known Tower building at Stout, 
is named in his honor. 

Bowman was born July 18, 
1887, in Prescott, Wis. He re- 
ceived a diploma from Stout 
in 1909. He also received a 
bachelor's degree from Columbia 
University and a master's degree 
from UW-Madison. 

He is listed in Who's Who 
in American Education and His- 
tory of the Wisconsin State 
Universities. 

Bowman is survived by his 
two daughters: Nancy, Mrs. 
Eisten L. Neufer, Sherborn, 
Mass., and Mary Alice, Mrs. 
Joseph F. Fisher, Khinelander. 
He is also survived by six grand- 
children and two great-grand- 
children. He was preceded in 
death by his wife, Marjorie Bish 
Bowman. 



Placement remains strong 



Placement of recent Stout gradu- 
ates continues to be strong, even 
in a time of worsening economic 
conditions, according to the 
University's recently published 
annual placement report. 

The report, which covers gradu- 
ates from the three classes of the 
1980-81 academic year, shows an 
overall placement record of 93.2 
percent. "This overall percentage 
compares with the 93.9 percent 
placement record of the previous 
year," the report said. 

Robert Dahlke, director of 
Career Planning and Placement 
Services at Stout, said that of those 
graduates placed, 82 percent are 
working in jobs directly related to 
their majors at Stout. Dahlke said 
that this means Stout's career- 
oriented majors continue to pro- 
duce graduates to fill jobs in busi- 
ness and industry. 

But in writing for the report, 
Dahlke acknowledged that stu- 
dents had to work harder to secure 
employment. "As the recession 
deepened, many companies slowed 
down or even froze hiring," the 
report said. "This trend started in 
the spring of 1980 and continued 



throughout 1981." As an indication 
of this, the report shows that on- 
campus recruitment declined by 
approximately 22 percent, when 
compared with the previous year. 

"We still have more than 200 
companies coming to campus," 
Dahlke said. He added that the 
decline in the number of visits 
must be viewed relative to the 
previous year, which was a record 
high for recruiting. "The kind of 
students that come to Stout are 
very career minded and want to 
work," Dahlke said. They did work 
harder in 1981 to find their jobs." 
Dahlke also pointed out that Stout 
graduates are "flexible" in the kind 
of work that they can do. "They 
can use their skills in several dif- 
ferent job markets," Dahlke said. 
"That seems more important in a 
tighter job market." 

The report shows an even higher 
placement rate for graduate stu- 
dents. "Graduate programs con- 
tinue to do well with a placement 
record of 96 percent," Dahlke said. 
"This is consistent with the past." 

Graduating classes covered in 
the report were for December 
1979, and May and August 1980. 



Enrollment stable 

Enrollment at Stout is 7,458, 
according to official figures re- 
leased by the University. 

The figures, which are submitted 
to UW System administration, show 
an increase of approximately one- 
half of a percent from 7,413 last 
year. 

According to the University's 
enrollment report, admissions con- 
trols resulted in a decline of 141 
new freshman and 53 under- 
graduate transfer students. The 
report shows that out-of-state resi- 
dents account for 29.8 percent of 
the student body and 37.3 percent 
of new freshman. 

The 1,882 Minnesota residents 
enrolled represented 24.4 percent 
of the total enrollment, 84.8 per- 
cent of the non-resident enrollment 
and 31.4 percent of new freshman. 



Hall of fame 

Nominations are now being ac- 
cepted for the University's 
Athletic Hall of Fame. The 
names of individuals being nomi- 
nated should be sent to Michael 
Ritland, Chairman; UW-Stout 
Hall of Fame; Menomonie, Wis., 
54751, Generally, candidates 
nominated should have gradu- 
ated from Stout at least 10 years 
ago. 



Paul Goede's gastronomical goodbye 




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the chef in the kitchen 



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lie is an institution within an institution: Few students 
liave been graduated from Stout in the last 16 years 
without coming in contact with Paul Goede, Having 
built a strong reputation for distinctive dining and good 
taste at the University, he retired April 1 at the age of 63. 

In his years at Stout, Goede made it his business to 
share with the university community a little of the grace 
and appreciation for dining that he had acquired from 
years of work as a professional chef. 

Born the son and grandson of German chefs, Goede 
learned the family trade as a boy. (The German spelling 
of his name is Goethe.) His parents owned a restaurant 
for 40 years and he grew up practiced in the art of 
fine cooking. 

A short, hearty man with snow-white hair and a 
friendly disposition, he looks the part of a chef, as if he 
were typecast for his role in life. "I love food, and it 
shows," he said. At Price Commons, sitting among 
volumes of records and computer printouts, it is obvious 
that he is a food service manager. But it is the plaques, 
certificates, awards and photographs that line his office 
walls that hint that the man has had a colorful life. 

Before coming to Stout in 1966, Goede had worked 
extensively as a chef throughout the upper Midwest 
in distinctive restaurants including Mader's German 
Bestaurant in Milwaukee and the Edgewater in Madison. 
He had a television show in Milwaukee at one time in 
which he cooked before a live audience. He was also 
active in culinary competitions that gained him an im- 
pressive display of awards. 

When he came to Stout to interview for his job, 
President William J. Micheels made provision to see him 
personally because his wife was a fan, so to speak, of 
Goede's, having clipped some of his award-winning 
recipes from the "New York Times" and the "Chicago 
Tribune." 



In the interview, President Micheels mentioned that 
the University was planning to begin a program in hotel 
and restaurant management and asked Goede if he might 
teach a few classes as well as take on the duties of food 
service director. Goede said he knew he had found a 
home. 

In his years with Stout, Goede not only taught hotel 
and restaurant courses but also completed a degree in 
hotel and restaurant management. 

Among his special projects at Stout have been dinner 
dances for students in the residence halls which he calls 
"monotony breaks." 

One of his favorite projects was teaching social dining 
etiquette to students. At one time, Goede recalls, he ran 
a program in which students were sent formal, engraved 
invitations with B.S.V.P.'s to an evening dinner. On 
arrival, they were greeted with both a feast and a learn- 
ing opportunity. "We served a complete meal with 
everything from soup to the finger bowl," said Goede. 
"The finger bowl often brought the question which 
spoon do I use?'" The evening included tips on how 
to order, how to handle a napkin, and what to do with 
cocktail forks and other special utensils. 

Goede noted his interest in the etiquette course began 
when he ate at a restaurant with some fraternity men 
he advised. "I thought, 'my god, these people are going 
out into industry'," he said. "Today our managers and 
supervisors have to be able to meet the public." He 
said he thought his contribution to their preparation for 
such work could include social etiquette. 

Goede is known best at Stout for his flair and finesse 
with special dining events. He was an adviser to many 
of Stout's Haute Cuisine dinners. Recently, he has been 
responsible for Stout's festive Elizabethan Chirstmas 
Dinner. The meal he prepared for the visiting University 
of Wisconsin Board of Begents two years ago left a 
lasting impression. 



While the University may miss the added touch of 
flaming cherries jubilee, what Goede will miss most in 
retirement is working with students, "That's what I'll 
miss, the kids," he said. "I've had a real full life with 
the' kids here, I've loved them, they are beautiful." 

He said that he tells his wife if they ever need some- 
where to go he can always work for one of the students 
that he has sent out of the University. 

Goede relates many stories about the Stout alumni 
that he meets as he tours the country with his consulting 
work. "Once I ran through the Chicago airport and a 
kid came out of a cocktail lounge and grabbed me," 
Goede said. "I couldn't talk to him then but I promised 
that I would stop in on my way back home. When I did 
get back, we talked in the bar that he now managed 
and I kidded him about the uniforms that the waitresses 
were wearing. I knew he must have picked them out." 

"It is so fun to walk into hotels in Boston and all over 
the country and be recognized by Stout grads," he said. 
"Once on a trip to Florida, I boarded a plane and the 
hostess came up and gave me a hug. She was a Stout 

gl « C !'" 
"I'm not retiring, I'm changing careers," Goede said. 

He is currently doing consulting work and seminars for 

a food company. He said that he and his wife have 

been accepted in a society of wine educators and have 

already taken one tour through Ohio wineries. Goede 

noted that he would like to do occasional traveling but 

will continue to live in Menomonie. 

"The Lord willing, I would like to put some of the 

7,000 to 9,000 recipes I've collected on a computer," 

Coede said. "I forecast (in) the future, there will be no 

cookbooks, but rather, computers in every kitchen." 

"I am going to enjoy my time off," he said. "I'd like 
to get up in the morning with nothing planned and go 
to bed half done." 



Behind the wrapping 

While the wide variety of consumer goods on the market may 
make it difficult to choose, the product's package is an indi- 
cator of the quality inside, according to Marvin Kufahl, 
professor of materials and processes at Stout. 

"It is the silent salesman," Kufahl said. "Both insK 
outside the package sells quality. A good quality 



ares about 



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age 
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gives you the impression the manufacturer 
product." 

Likewise, Kufahl noted, automotive 
tools thrown into a plastic bag indicate 
less concern and possibly a lesser quality 
product. 

Kufahl, who is the coordinator of the 
packaging program in Stout's School of 
Industry and Technology, noted that the 
packaging industry is as concerned 
about conserving resources as it is in 
delivering quality to the consumer. 

"Only four tenths of 1 percent of the 
nation's oil consumption is used by the 
packaging industry," Kufahl said. The 
disposable plastic containers thrown 
away in homes daily constitutes little 
waste for the benefits they bring, he said. 

Much packaging material is made of recycled paper, Kufahl 
said. "Particularly in the food industry, with cake mix and 
cereal boxes and related items," he said. 

He said the cosmetic industry is the only one that dis- 
continued the use of recycled paper in packaging because it 
was not accepted by consumers. "Becycled paper is usually 
gray — the gray that you see inside cereal boxes, and people 
are particular about buying personal products from a gray 
box," Kufahl said. 

He noted that fast-food chains often receive criticism for 
their extensive use of disposable serving containers, especially 
those made from Styrofoam. He said that this practice is not 
entirely necessary for the consumer since the package usually 
lasts only a few minutes before it is thrown away. In addi- 
tion, Styrofoam used in this kind of packaging is not re- 
cyclable. Yet, he added, that the cost to the fast-food franchise 
is about the same as if they used paper products. 

The wave of the future will be flexible packaging, Kufahl 
said. One example that is already jjenetraing the market is 
milk in a bag. "The recess pouch saves space in the stores 
and at home and reduces litter," Kufahl said. He. cited a 
school system in central Wisconsin that is buying milk this 
way. The school once had a trash can full of cartons after 
lunch, but now has one-quarter as much with the pouches. 
Half-gallon and quart-size pouches are used with a handle 
for storage and handling convenience, 

He noted that manufacturers are also working on a "retort 
pouch" made of flexible plastic and aluminum that may re- 
place the tin can. 

According to Kufahl, the packaging field has grown con- 
siderably in the last 15 years and continues to be a developing 
industry. "Fifteen years ago when something came off the 
production line it would go to the packaging department with 
orders to package it .' Today, packaging is represented on 
new product development committees from the start," he said. 
"Today, nothing is shipped unless it is packaged and nothing 
in the market is not shipped." 



Class Notes 



1910-1941 

ZITA MCGIVERN GAVIN Dip. 10 
is residing at 15 Boyle Place, Fond du 
Lac. 

GLADYS BOASE Dip. '14 is resid- 
ing at 5132 Thrasher Court, Portage, 
Mich. 

INGA W. WALLUM 
ALBRECHTSON Dip. '16 is residing at 
Wilmington, Del. 

ALVA A. ELLISON BUSS Dip. '17 is 
residing at 1407 N. Salem, Arlington 
Heights, 111. 

DORA BAKER HAWSON Dip. '20 is 
residing at 233 N. Val Vista Drive 
#5721, Mesa, Ariz. 

RUTH REID HILL Dip. '22 reports 
she is sorry to have missed Stout's 
homecoming this year. She is living at 
418 W. Matthews Ave., Jonesboro, Ark. 

HENRY LIND Dip. '22 is residing at 
146 McCready, Louisville, Ky. 

WILLIAM II. HAMILTON '27 is re- 
siding at 716 Prospect St., Durand. 

FRANCIS O. JULIN '31 is residing 
at 2800 N.E. 28th St., #1, Lighthouse, 
Point, Fla. 

L. G. WINES BS '33, MS '42 is re- 
siding at 1947 Chester Lane, Cambria, 
Calif. 

PALMER O. BREKKE '38 is residing 
at 896 Snowfall Spur, Akron, Ohio. 

BETTY MILNES PETERSON '40 is 
residing at 220 Fourth St., Lake 
Oswego, Ore. 

GEORGE F. ALT '40 is residing at 
9922 Walker House Road #4, 
Gaithersburg, Mo. 

HELEN WILLEMS WHITBECK BS 
'41, MS '54 is residing at 8536 W. 
Oklahoma Ave., Milwaukee. 



1942-1958 

VIOLET BUBLITZ LARSON '42 is 

residing at 4011 30th Ave. S., 
Minneapolis. 

VIRGINIA BELL MUNDAY '43 is 
residing at 16240 Sand Pedro #82, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

CATHERINE NICK BURTNESS '45 
is residing at Woodruff. 

MARALYN PROKECH INGWELL 
'46 is residing at 547 Westwood Village 
II, St. Paul, Minn. 

ARTHUR (BUD) MEDTLIE '47 was 
named "Citizen of the Year" by the 
Menomonie Area Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

HAROLD SATTERLUND '50 is re- 
siding at Route 2, New Richmond. 

ROBERT GRAY '50 is safety mana- 
ger for the Caterpillar Tractor Co., 
Aurora, 111. 

BOB MCKAY '50 is vocational di- 
rector at St. Louis Park Senior High 
School and resides in Minnetonka, 
Minn. 

ROBERT G. CHRISTIANSON '50 is 
employed as an electronics technician 
with the FAA in Palacios, Texas. He 
can be reached at 410 Third St., 
Palacios, Texas. 

JOANNE BUBOLTZ HAGEN '52 is 
residing in Los Angeles and is a con- 
sultant dietitian in health care 
iscilitiGS 

WILLIAM SIREK MS '54 will retire 
as director of the Fox Valley Technical 
Institute, effective June 30. 



CELIA FRITZ LAUSTED '55 has 

served on the Governor's Task Force 
on the Status of Women and is a sup- 
porter of Marital Property Reform 
Assembly Bill 370. 

WARREN M. MAURER MS '55 has 
been appointed manager of material 
control and quality analysis at the 
Wilton Co., Columbia, Penn. 

CYNTHIA SUTTER EBERT BS '58, 
MS '68 has been named a member of 
the state council of Wisconsin Home 
Economists in Elementary and Second- 
ary Education and is secretary of the 
board of directors of the Ripon Area 
Service Center Inc. 

ROBERT R. WALLBERG MS '58 has 
retired from teaching and is operating 
a riding stable in Pine River, Minn. 

1959-1972 

HERBERT MEHNE BS '59, MS '62 
is vocational coordinator and assistant 
principal with the Menomonie Public 
Schools. 

JIM TOMS '59 has been promoted to 
general product manager with the 
Honeywell Motor Products Division at 
Rockford, 111. 

JEANETTE KEPHART 
HOLLENBERGER '65 is teaching in 
the Fennimore system where she is liv- 
ing with her husband and two children. 

BONNIE JENNINGS SILVERSTEIN 
'65 is residing at 10341 E. Evans #160, 
Denver. 

ADONIS SEISER MCLAIN MS '68 
won best of division award at an art 
exhibit at Lutheran Campus Center, 
Middleton, and the opportunity to have 
a one-person show at the Center in 1982. 

ERRIN BANES BS '68, MS '73 has 
purchased a recreation vehicle park in 
Frankenmuth, Mich. 

RUTH EGGERT '70 is a 4-H and 
youth agent for the Racine County 
Extension. 

CHRISTINER VOLL CHERNIN '70 
is a school psychologist in Albany, 
Calif., where she and husband Phillip 
are restoring a 125-year old Victorian 
house. 

RAYMOND S. ERSPAMER '71 is the 
manager of industrial engineering at 
RTE-ASEA Corp., Waukesha. 

FAYE LUMSDEN SCHEIL '72 is di- 
rector of financial aid at the University 
of Dubuque and has been elected 
president of the Iowa Association of 
Student Financial Aid Administrators. 

DALE K. STONEK '72 is a graphic 
arts teacher at West Allis Hale High 
School and attended the National Print- 
ing Equipment and Supply Association 
in Pittsburgh, Penn. 

1973-1976 

RICHARD D. BELL MS '73 has been 
appointed director of Children's Court 
Services by the Eau Claire County 
Board of Supervisors. 



The Stout Alumnus 

The Stout Alumnus is an official publica- 
tion of University of Wisconsin-Stout. It 
is published quarterly by the Office of 
University Relations and is distributed to 
graduates, friends and faculty of the 
University. It is entered at the post office 
In Menomonie, Wis., as third class matter. 

John K. Enger Editor 

Carol Richard Ass't. to the Editor 

Mary Hlntzman Class Notes 

Permission to reproduce articles from the 
Stout Alumnus is not required so long as 
acknowledgment is given to this publica- 
tion. 



LOUISE S. VANDERWALKER 
BERG '73 is a receptionist at the 
Arcadia Primary Care Clinic and is an 
instructor for a weight control through 
behavior modification course at the 
Clinic. 

PAUL J. AUSLAND '74 is a senior 
rehabilitation counselor for Moose 
Lake, Minn., Office of Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. 

SUSAN FUNK PUTRA '74 is teach- . 
ing at Riverside Junior High in 
Watertown. 

CARL SAFFORD '74 is a police 
officer with the Milwaukee Police De- 
partment. 

LARRY COUEY '74 is vice president 
of operations and partner in a newly 
formed perfume company called 
Parfums de Coeur, which headquarters 
in Stamford, Conn. 

JEFFREY S. MEYER '75 has gradu- 
ated from Marquette Law School and 
has a general law practice in Milwaukee. 

GENE O'CONNELL '75 is marketing 
manager for Hillmark Corp. Resides in 
Milwaukee. 

FRANK W. SCHNEIDER '75 is the 
torpedo division officer aboard the fleet 
ballistic missile submarine USS Henry 
Clay, homeported in Charleston, S.C. 

MARY CATURIA JOSLIN '75 is 
head start teacher at the Radisson Head 
Start Center. 

NAN DUESCHER BAUMGARTNER 
'7fi is a home economist in Fond du 
Lac County and is working on her 
master's at UW-Oshkosh. 

VIRGINIA EDGE '76 has been named 
executive director of the Wisconsin 
Pork Producers Association Coopera- 
tive. 

MANNY MORALEDA '76 is an in- 
dustrial arts teacher at Marion High 
School and taught a 10-week class on 
calligraphy in Manawa. 

JIM ODNESS '76 teaches industrial 
education at Independence, where he 
and his wife reside. 

MARY SCHILLING THOMPSON '76 
is a freelance home economist and is 
teaching microwave cooking classes for 
the Fox Valley Technical Institute. 

LISA UBBELOHDE '76 was ordained 
into the christian ministry at the Colfax 
Lutheran Church and will serve as 
pastor for the Community Lutheran 
Church of Butler, Penn. 

1977-1979 

THOMAS WAGENER '77 is teaching 
auto mechanics at Eleva-Strum High 
School. 

THOMAS DESTREE '77 is a senior 
technical writer/editor with Graphic 
Arts Technical Foundation and was a 
contributor to a book published by 
GATF called "Graphic Arts 
Photography: Black and White." 

J. TARA BUCHANAN WISDORF 77 
is the manager of Tel-Sel Co. Inc., an 
industrial sales firm in Minneapolis. 

KEITH LARSON '77 is a salesman for 
Arrow Building Center in River Falls. 

DAVID '78 and ELIZABETH 
HARRINGTON HOFFMAN '78 are re- 
siding jn St. Paul, Minn., where they 
both work for 3M. She is a senior 
production control analyst and he is a 
pricing specifications analyst. 

MARY PLATNER O'CONNOR '78 is 
teaching home economics at South 
Milwaukee High School. 



CARSON TIMBLIN '78 is a senior at 
the University of Dubuque and is serv- 
ing as student pastor for the Soldier's 
Grove, Readstown and North Clayton 
United Methodist Churches. 

JOHN WIDSTRAND JR. '78 has been 
promoted to project engineer with the 
Kohler Co. in Kohler, where he re- 
sides with his wife and daughter. 

JAY ZIRBEL BS '78, MS '81 has been 
appointed chairman of the welding de- 
partment at Casper College in Casper, 
Wyo. 

JOHN PRESSLEIN MS '78 is coordi- . 
nator of the service trades division at 
Northeast Wisconsin Technical Insti- 
tute and has been elected director of 
the Wisconsin section of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

WENDA SCHWOCH '78 has been 
promoted to research scientist in the 
microelectronics section of the systems 
and research center of Honeywell Inc. 
He resides in Minneapolis. 

SUE SEVER FOXWELL MS '78 has 
been elected president of the Wisconsin 
Home Economics Association. 

LEO SCHINDLER '79 has been ap- 
pointed to operations officer at the 
Menomonie Farmer's Credit Union. 

ROGER PAULSON '79 is employed 
by De Luxe Check Printers in 
Shoreview, Minn., in process control. 

LYNN STONE SHOWALTER '79 is a 
teacher in general learning disabilities 
at Hibbing High School and is an ad- 
viser for West Range Youth ARC. 

MARY C. COURT '79 is a supervisor 
in the group insurance department 
for the Allstate Insurance Co. in 
Northbrook, 111. 



Stout tie 




This navy-colored silk tie with 
the symbolic Stout Tower is now 
available through the University 
Bookstore. Cost is $13, including 
postage and handling. Interested 
alumni should contact Bill 
Porter at the Bookstore, 
Memorial Student Center. 
Wisconsin residents must add 48 
cents for state sales tax. 



MICHAEL DORENDORF '79 has 

been selected to teach the GM mini- 
coupe training program sponsored by 
the Inter-Industry Conference on Auto 
Collision Repair. 

1980 

PETER J. and KIT HOFFMAN 
WERNER '78 are residing in Mankato, 
Minn. 

BOB BRIESE is assistant manager 
of the Wisconsin Club in Milwaukee 
where he hosted the annual Milwaukee 
gathering of Stout alumni in October. 

DANIEL J. PLISZKA BS '80, MS '81 
is a safety specialist with Union Carbide 
Corp., nuclear division, in Oak Ridge, 
Tenn. 

JULIE PECINA will be attending the 
University of Surrey, England, on a 
Rotary Fellowship during the 1982-83 
school year. 

NANCY RYAN GEHRKE BS '80, MS 
'81 is teaching home economics and 
serving as winter cheerleading coach 
at Hustisford High School. 

BRIAN CRASS is a salesman with 
the Raabe Paint Co. in Wauwatosa. 

MARK DOBBS is an industrial arts 
teacher at Bartlett High School in 
Anchorage, Alaska. 

. LESTER HAGEN is an industrial 
engineer with Cannon Equipment, 
Cannon Falls, Minn. 

DANIEL OLSON is an industrial 
education instructor at Caledonia 
Public Schools, Caledonia, Minn. 

JIM HANS is a project engineer with 
the Hospital Building and Equipment 
Co. in St. Louis, Mo. 

MICHAEL A. PIETROWIAK is an 
industrial arts teacher with the River 
Falls School District. 

HENRY II. GILOW ME is a psychol- 
ogist in the Winneconne School District. 

SHAWN VAN ERT is a rehabilitation 
specialist with the International Re- 
habilitation Association in Minneapolis. 

1981 

DIANE K. DIRKSMEYER is assist- 
ant manager at Bostwicks in Richland 
Center and resides at 125V2 S. Church 
St. 

JACQUELYN R. STROOT is residing 
at 325 H Chapel Ridge Drive, 
Hazelwood, Mo., and is a software 
quality engineer for McDonnell- 
Douglas Corp. in St. Louis. 

DIANE GRINNELL is a group 
therapist at St. Mary's Hospital in 
Minneapolis. 

RONALD SALTZMANN is a sales 
engineer with the Intel Corp. in Santa 
Clara, Calif. 

THOMAS HARMEYER is employed 
by I.B.M. Corp. in Tucson, Ariz., as an 
industrial engineer. 

RICHARD AMUNDSON is a com- 
puting analyst with McDonnell 
Douglas Automation of Long Beach, 
Calif. 

JILL KINATEDER is a special edu- 
cation teacher at Dawson-Boyd School 
in Dawson, Minn. 

SHARON MCKINNON SCHNEIDER 
is teaching special education at 
Kaukauna High School. 

GARY HEELER is an instructor in 
small engine and chassis at Lakeshore 
Technical Institute in Cleveland. 

GREG A. VALLEY is a service 
technician with Kearney and Trecker 
in Milwaukee. 



Marriages 



1970-1977 

Pauline Ksionek to J. MICHAEL 
FLOOD '70, Oct. 30, Hayward, Calif., 
where couple resides. 

CARLANE J. VON HADEN '73 to 
Paul M. Burbey, Oct. 31, Elroy. Couple 
resides in Manitowoc. 

Mary Lemorande to DAVID II. 
OLSON '74, Aug. 8, Oconto Falls. 
Couple resides in Chippewa Falls. 

LINDA JEAN WIEDENBAUER '75 
to David H. Glazer, Sept. 5, Eagle 
River, where couple resides. 

Diana K. Thomas to DALE J. EHLERS 
'75, Oct. 31, Waukesha. Couple resides 
in North Prairie. 

DEBRA K. ANDERSON '76 to 
MICHAEL R. MARTIN '80, Dec. 31, 
1980, Menomonie. Couple resides in 
Palatine, 111. 

Ellen L. Gorman to MICHAEL J. 
BODOH '76, Oct. 24, Lebanon. Couple 
resides in New London. 

Patricia A. Blend to ROBERT 
KRAHN '76, Oct. 17, Wauwatosa. 
Couple resides in Milwaukee. 

LINDA MARIE WALSH '76 to 
James E. Scharine, Oct. 17, Kenosha. 
Couple resides in Delavan. 

CHERYL A. SARG '77 to Michael G. 
Pulda, Aug. 29, Racine, where couple 

J. TARA BUCHANAN '77 to Donald 
Wisdorf, June 20, Mequon. Couple re- 
sides in Maple Grove, Minn. 

1978-1979 

BONNIE ZIEGLER '78 to STEVE 

DAVEL '79, Sept. 26, Taylors Falls, 
Minn. Couple resides in St. Paul, Minn. 

BERNICE VIETH '78 to John 
Fromuth, Sept. 5, Ontario. Couple re- 
sides in Atlantic Highlands, N.J. 

JUDY P. MYIIRA '78 to Johnny E. 
Smith, Nov. 28, Iola. Couple resides in 
Waupaca. 

JANICE HAYES KOCH '78 to 
Robert O'Neil, Aug. 1, Racine, where 
the couple resides. 

ANN MARIE APPLETON '78 to 
AREND A. STAM '78, Sept. 5, Oshkosh. 

NANCY F. THOMPSON '78 to John 
Zavodny, Oct. 3, Boyceville, where the 
couple resides. 

SUSAN MARIE FELLOWS '79 to 
MARK ALLEN GREENWAY '79, Sept. 
19, Rochester, Minn. Couple resides in 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

RENEE S. FINDER '79 to Thomas 
Surdick, Aug. 15, Menomonie. Couple 
resides in Watertown. 

VICTORIA L. HANCOCK '79 to W. 
Leonard Ayres, Sept. 4, Los Angeles. 
Couple resides in Northridge, Calif. 

HEIDI HASSELQUIST '79 to Thomas 
Van, Aug. 8, Mauston. Couple resides 
in Houston. 

Carol L. Mitchell to MICHAEL J. 
KORNACKI '79, Aug. 29, Defiance, 
Ohio. Couple resides in Dayton, Ohio. 

CINDY PAULSON '79 to MARK 
KIRSCHLING '80, Sept. 19, Gillett. 
Couple resides in Fond du Lac. 

KIM MARIE RUBSAM '79 to James 
W. Krier, Oct. 11, Menomonee Falls. 
Couple resides in Dallas. 

JEAN MARIE ZEMBINSKI '79 to 
Kurt S. Duch, Oct. 10. Couple resides 
in Milwaukee. 



10 



1980-1981 

Karin Ann Wilde to GREGORY LEE 

BERRY '80, Sept. 5, Thompson. Couple 
resides in La Crosse. 

Jacqueline J. Piguet to STEVEN J. 
BOHMAN '80, Sept. 26, Marshfield. 
Couple resides in Savage, Minn. 

SUSAN KAY DAVIS '80 to Mark T. 
Hyllested, Aug. 15, Rice Lake, where 
the couple resides. 

TERRY ANNE DONGARRA '80 to 
DAVID MARK KARLMAN '80, Sept. 
19, Janesville. Couple resides in West 
Allis. 

NANCY RYAN BS '80, MS '81 to 
JOHN GEHRKE '80, Sept. 5, Menomonie. 
Couple resides in Fox Lake. 

Susan Kay Kersten to ROBERT C. 
GAFFNEY '80, Oct. 10, Marshall. 
Couple resides in Sun Prairie. 

JODY MILLER '80 to ROBERT 
BONSEN '78, Sept. 5, Hopkins, Minn. 
Couple resides in Golden Valley, Minn. 

TERESA A. MURPHY '80 to Michael 
Snyder, June. Couple resides in New 
Brighton, Minn. 

SARA L. OLSON '80 to Steve A. 
Jubert, Sept. 26, Green Bay, where 
couple resides. 

JOANN KAY RUFENER '80 to 
Michael J, Huber, Oct. 3, Monroe. 
Couple resides in Chicago. 

NANCY JOAN TEICHEN '80 to 
JAMES R. BROOK '79, Aug. 9, 
Elmhurst, 111. Couple resides in 

Karen Ann Olejniczak to PETER G. 
VERBETEN '80, Aug. 21, DePere. 
Couple resides in Jeffersonville, Ind. 

DONNA JEAN WALTER '80 to 
RANDY CURTIS KUPPER '80, Oct. 31. 
Couple resides in New Brighton, Minn. 

DEBRA JEAN WOHLERS '80 to Isaac 
Moon Andrews, Sept. 11, Appleton, 
where couple resides. 

ANNE-MARIE FLAGSTAD '81 to 
Michael V. Walker, Aug. 21, Superior. 
Couple resides in Baton Rouge, La. 

NANCY ANNETTE FUNK '81 to 
JOHN MICHAEL GARDNER 81, Aug. 
1, Janesville. Couple resides in Tampa, 
Fla. 



LYNNE ROSE KOMP '81 to 
MICHAEL JOHN GROSS '81, July 11, 
Hubertus. Couple resides in Milwaukee. 

Laurie Jane Seubert to MICHAEL 
JAMES ROCK '81, Oct. 17, Rozellville. 
Couple resides in Stratford. 



Births 



1969-1974 

A son, April 9, to David and 
PATRICIA KANGAS BLOSHENKO 

'69, Air Force Academy, Colorado. 

A son, Timothy Francis, Oct. 28, to 
Terry and MARGY WOOD INGRAM 
BS '70, MS '76, Menomonie. 

A son, Lane Charles, to HERB BS 
'69, MS '71 and Glenda CARLSON, 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

A daughter, Courtney Anne, Sept. 24, 
to CHARLES '71 and Carol PYTLARZ, 
Lake Zurich, 111. 

A son, Brent Andrew, May 9, to RAY 
'71 and Debbie ERSPAMER, 
Mukwonago. 

A son, Derrick Ryan, June 2, to 
Leonard and CAROL BLACHOWIAK 
KRZEWINA '73, Wausaukee. 

A son, Scott Michael, June 21, to 
TODD '75 and DEBORAH WERTII 
HAMMOND '73, Oelwein, Iowa. 

A son, Andrew Damon, Sept. 4, to 
DENNIS '73 and KATHY DAMON 
BECHER '73, Appleton. 

A daughter, Stephanie Lynn, Sept. 
15, to CLIFTON BS '74, MS '78 and 
Margaret BEYER, Sault Sainte Marie, 
Mich. 

1975-1980 

A son, Michael Daniel, Sept. 9, to 
Daniel and KATHLEEN PLOOSTER 
JOHNSON '75, Maple Grove, Minn. 

A son, Charles, June 8, to GENE 
O'CONNELL '75, Milwaukee. 

A daughter, Carly Ann, June 12, to 
JIM '76 and SHEILA HABECK 
NELSON '76, Des Moines, Iowa. 

A son, Aaron Gordon, Aug. 12, to 
Steve and DEBBIE AINSWORTH 
BARTZ '76, Seymour. 



A daughter, Jennifer Marie, Sept. 24, 
to STEVEN GANS '76, Milwaukee. 

A son, Brent Robert, April 18, to 
Patrick and BONNIE SCHOOL 
COSTELLO '77, Appleton. 

A daughter, Rebecca Lynn, Sept. 28, 
to Ken and MARY DIRKZWAGER 
FORD '77, St. Paul, Minn. 

A son, Dana William, Dec. 5, 1980, 
to KAREN KETTLEWELL 
HARRINGTON MS '78, Laramie, Wyo. 

A son, Matthew David, Feb. 2, to- 
DAVID '80 and PHOEBE SCHNEIDER 
DUFFY '80, Plymouth, Minn. 



Deaths 



1906-1979 

BESSIE PECK Dip. '06, 96, Nov. 5, 
Hayward. 

BESSIE SANDS MACDONALD Dip. 
'15, Oct. 1, Sheboygan. 

RALPH G. PAGE Dip. '15, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

HORTENSE SEAMAN Dip. '17, 
March, Mt. Horeb. 

INEZ NELSON WOLFE class of '19, 
91, June 17, Algoma. 

ARLENE SCHMITZ KLINGLER Dip. 
'22, May 17, Snohomish, Wash. 

HARRY P. BUBOLTZ BS '28, MS 
'44, Aug. 3, Kansas City, Mo. 

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS HANSON 
'30, 73, Dec 5, Harlingen, Texas. 

HAROLD SILVIUS '30, 73, Aug, 13, 
Detroit. 

WALTER E. O'JAY '32, Sept. 13, 
Hibbing, Minn. 

GERTRUDE LOTWIN ROSENFIELD 
'35, 67, Nov. 26, Bethesda, Md. 

ALFRED E. JOHNSON '39, 80, Oct. 
14, Roseville, Minn. 

JAMES BREITZMAN '40, 63, Jan. 10, 
New Port Richey, Fla. 

MARY GAUVIN KIRKBY '43, 59, 
Dec, 6, Whitefish Bay. 

HOWARD HEIGL BS '53, MS '56, 58, 
Racine. 

STERLING R. PROUTY '67, Colbert, 
Wash. 

DANIEL STARK '79, June 1, Mauston. 



Stout names new alumni relations officer 



A new administrator for 
Alumni Relations lias been 
appointed at Stout. She is Pat 
Reisinger, who will carry the 
title of assistant director of 
Development and Alumni 
Services. 

Reisinger is a Stout gradu- 
ate, having received her 
bachelor's degree here in 1961 
and her master's degree in 
1967. Reisinger's undergrad- 
uate degree is in home eco- 
nomics education and lier 
graduate degree is in cloth- 
ing and textiles. 

In her new position, 
Reisinger will be responsible 
for initiating, planning and 
conducting all alumni events 
of the University. She will 
supervise alumni records and 
will be involved in recruiting 




'W 






i^^m^ 



^ S 



W 



M 




i I 



Reisinger 

volunteers. She will also be 
involved in alumni fund- 
raising activities. 



Reisinger told the Stout 
Alumnus that she hopes to 
create greater involvement of 
students now enrolled at 
Stout. She also wants greater 
involvement with faculty 
members. "I hope faculty 
members will feel a part of 
alumni activities," she said. 
"I will be working with 
faculty to develop programs 
for alumni." Reisinger added 
that anyone interested in 
doing volunteer work for 
Stout should contact her 
office. 

Reisinger's background in- 
cludes extensive teaching ex- 
perience in schools through- 
out Wisconsin. Since 1977, 
she has taught home eco- 
nomics for grades seven and 
eight in Menomonie. 



11 



Class works to build own airplane 



There is no room for error by stu- 
dents enrolled in Dan Massopust's 
class. Massopust teaches a three- 
credit course at Stout titled 
"Aircraft Construction Workshop." 

The 15 students enrolled in the 
course are assembling what will be 
a fully-flyable aircraft, with most 
parts made from scratch. 

"I'm teaching them how to work 
together and I'm teaching them 
craftsmanship, because there is no 
compromise here at all, everything 
has to be perfect," Massopust said. 
"They're going to be flying this 
thing and you can't pull off to the 
side of the road when you're 3,000 
feet in the air." 

"Every single part in the air- 
plane is made by hand from raw 
material," he said. "It is not a kit 
airplane. All jigs have been made 
by hand. Most of the metal has 
been cut out by hand. All wood- 
work has been formed." 

According to Massopust, the 
engine will be constructed from 
parts salvaged from airplane 
crashes. 

Massopust added that students 
have made numerous design 
changes from the aircraft's proto- 
type, which is called Acro-II. 

Work on the aircraft is taking 
place in Stout's manufacturing 
laboratory, which is capable of 
housing industrial-size operations. 

Massopust explained that air- 
craft construction is a useful tool 
to teach a variety of different sub- 
jects such as metal work, wood- 
work, hydraulics, aluminum work, 
riveting, and even interior design 
and upholstery. 

Massopust added that because 
quality is so critical in aircraft 
construction, it is difficult to as- 
sign grades. "I cannot grade them 
on the quality of the work," he 
said. "All the work has to be A 
quality. They are not allowed to 
turn in anything less than perfect." 
Instead, Massopust explained, he 
grades students on hours they put 
into the workshop. For example, 
students are required to put in a 
minimum of six hours a week to 
earn a C. Additional hours will 
be added up and divided between 
A and B grades for the course. 
Students rotate jobs so that each 
gets experience on various aspects 
of aircraft construction. 



The class has been proving ex- 
tremely popular at Stout. Its 15 
participants were chosen from 
some 35 applicants who sub- 
mitted essays on how they could 
benefit from the program. "I 
wanted to find people from all dis- 
ciplines (majors)," Massopust said. 
"I tried to pick people from (nearly) 
every discipline we have at Stout 
to prove to myself that everyone 
can benefit from this." In addi- 
tion to students from technically 
oriented majors at Stout, Massopust 
has in his course such unlikely 
majors as a nursing student (from 
UW-Eau Claire), who is interested 
in air ambulance service; and other 
students studying fashion mer- 
chandising and interior design. 

Massopust is teaching the course 
as an independent study project to 
earn credit toward a master of 
science degree from Stout in voca- 
tional education. He and his 
brother are also the project's 
"sponsor," meaning that they pro- 
vide the finances for parts and 
keep the finished plane. Massopust 
estimates they have invested .about 
$13,000 so far in the aircraft and 
will need about another $2,000 to 
finish it. Construction on the unit 
started at Messmer High School in 
Milwaukee, where Massopust re- 



cently taught; it will be completed 
at Stout this semester. The finished 
product will be a 21-foot biplane 
with a 23-foot wingspan, With a 
145-horsepower engine, the 875- 
pound plane is designed for per- 
forming aerobatics. It will hold 
two people. 

Massopust said that as construc- 
tion on the plane nears completion, 
a second plane, using a different 
design, will be started but not 
finished during this semester. 

Charles Yost, director of the 
manufacturing laboratory, said he 
made a portion of his facility 
available to Massopust because the 
technologies associated with air- 
craft construction are the same as 
those found in other manufactur- 
ing operations. "This is also the 
same quality concept that we are 
attempting to develop daily in 
our (student) manufacturing engi- 
neers," Yost said. "The concepts 
used here are precisely the same 
as those used by manufacturing 
engineering students." 

The 10,000-square foot manu- 
facturing laboratory, where the 
construction is taking place, is the 
largest educational facility of its 
kind in Wisconsin, according to 
Yost. 




students following plans 



People You Know 

A request to hear from families 
who have had several genera- 
tions attend Stout brought its 
first response. Lawrence Decker 
'48, writes that his uncles 
George Decker '28 (one of Stout's 
Distinguished Alumni recipients) 
and Harold Decker 13, began 
the Stout connection. Brothers 
Fred Decker '29 and Gerald 
"Huek" Decker '35, continued 
the connection. A nephew, 
Lawrence Olson RS '67, MS '68 
and two children, Hubert Decker 
(early 70s) and Mariann Decker 
(late 7()'s). also attended Stout. 
The Decker family involvement 
with Stout spans three genera- 
tions --are there others? Write 
to the Alumni office. 

* # 8 

David P. Barnard '46, Stout's 
dean of Learning Kosourccs, an- 
nounces the 17th annual Edu- 
cational Media and Technology 
Conference on the Stout campus, 
July 19-21. Featured speakers 
include Elizabeth Young, presi- 
dent of the Public Service 
Satellite Corp., and Dianne 
McAfee Williams, director of 
the Bureau of Instructional 



Programs, in the Library Services 
Division of the Wisconsin De- 
partment of Public. Instruction. 
The. conference includes an ex- 
tensive series of workshops, dis- 
plavs and demonstrations by 
exhibitors, and the annual 
"Piggus Hoastum" picnic. For 
more information, write to 

Barnard. 

« * # 

Mark your calendar lor July 29 
through Aug. 1. Those are the 
dales of the first Alumni Col- 
lege at Stout. Sponsored by 
the Alumni office and the Con- 
tinuing Education office, Alumni 
College is an excellent oppor- 
tunity for alumni and their fami- 
lies to return to campus for edu- 
cational classes, recreation and 
relaxation. A special daily pro- 
gram for children of all ages is 
included. Educational work- 
shops include topics such as 
photograph)' technique, basics 
of microcomputers, tourism, 
Scandinavian cooking, wood 
turning, robotics and many 
others. Lodging and meals on 
campus will be included. Alumni 
will be receiving a detailed 
brochure on the Alumni College 
in the near future or may write 
to the Stout Alumni office. 



FORE!!! The first Stout Alumni 
Golf Tournament will be held 
on July 31. Duffers at all levels 
are invited to tee off with class- 
mates and staff from Stout for 
what we hope will become an 
annual event. Full details, such 
as location, cost and prizes, will 
be coming in the mail. Start 
polishing your putters. Men and 
women are invited to participate. 
llllliilllllllilflllllllllflllilfl^ 

Madison-area alumni will gather 
on April 1 for a reception with 
Chancellor Robert Swanson '49, 
and Alumni Director Pat 
Heisinger '61. The reception is 
scheduled in conjunction with 
the Wisconsin Association of 
Vocational and Adult Education 
(WAVAE) convention. This re- 
ception will be at the Concourse 
Hotel in Madison from 5-7 p.m. 
All area alumni are invited to 
attend. Orv Nelson '56 has been 
involved in planning the event. 

Chicago-area alumni will have a 
chance to meet with Chancellor 
Robert Swanson and Alumni 
Director Pat Reisinger in late 
April. A special invitation is 
going to all area alumni. Bill 
Whitniore 79, is completing 
plans for the event. 



ALUMNUS 



Non-Profit Org. 

U.S. Postage Paid 

Menomonle, Wis. 

Permit No. 3 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MENOMONIE. WISCONSIN 54751 



If the person to whom this 
is addressed is located else- 
where, please write correct 
address on this side and 
return to post office. 

Return Postage Guaranteed 
Address Correction Requested 



SPRING 



1982